Standards and Accessibility

Oklahoma!

The Broadway show Oklahoma! opened during WWII on March 31, 1943 and ran for 2,212 performances. It was Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s first collaboration and it was a smash hit. There were many film offers from the studios but Rodgers and Hammerstein wanted to wait until they had made as much money as they could on Broadway, and from traveling companies, and from foreign stage shows.

They began production on the movie version almost ten years later. It was the first movie shot in Todd-AO, a widescreen format to rival CinemaScope. Todd-AO was shot on 65mm negative and Oklahoma! was shot at 30 frames per second. 30 frames per second eliminated the subliminal flicker of 24 frames per second which was otherwise standard. Unless they were under or over cranking. Want to speed up a horse race like in National Velvet? Undercrank.

The Silver Screen

I started working in the movies in theatrical post production in Manhattan and transferred to a Hollywood local in 1979. My first Hollywood job was working on the UCLA film archives project in studio vaults and I remember finding picture elements from Oklahoma! People don’t track things when a project is done. There’s no staff left, production is too complex, and pieces get filed oddly. Archiving was not really a thing then. Film was regularly sent for destruction after silver recovery. They didn’t call it the silver screen for nothing.

Production Requirements

When it comes time to do post production on a movie the money is mostly all spent, but they do budget for post production because it’s a production requirement. When it comes time to “add accessibility” to a digital project the money is definitely all spent because it was never a production requirement.

Operability

Released in 1955, Oklahoma! was shot in Todd-AO and simultaneously in CinemaScope. It was released in Todd-AO in 70mm and CinemaScope in 35mm anamorphic format. Supporting two versions was necessary because there weren’t enough theaters set up for Todd-AO. Operability was a problem.

Film Standards

Competing standards for shooting formats also brought about different standards for motion picture film stock. For instance, Todd-AO used Kodak Standard (KS) perforations while CinemaScope used Cinema Scope (CS) perforations that we called foxholes because originally only 20th Century Fox made CinemaScope movies.

Thanks to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), today’s web standards have helped create an environment far less restrictive than competing film format and film stock standards. You couldn’t run foxhole stock on a machine set up for Kodak Standard, but you could do the reverse. This site best viewed in Chrome reminds me of this.

Slow Down

Shot in Arizona and at at MGM Studios in Culver City, California, where I later worked,  Oklahoma! was released 12 years after the stage play debuted. Though Rodgers and Hammerstein did delay making the movie the fact is that making great things requires time. This still holds true. Making great software takes time. Look at the time put into operating systems. WordPress is 13 years in the making. We’re still developing the web 25 years later.

In a time of minimum viable products and largely inaccessible frameworks I have to wonder, what’s the rush? If you are going to leave out a sizeable portion of people by not including accessibility up front I guess you don’t have to slow down, but really, why rush to release without first considering accessibility? I know that some projects are urgent. I regularly worked 13.5 hour days seven days a week in the studios so I understand urgency. I’m just wondering what the rush is when you’re leaving out so many people.

Mission

My mission, by the way, in listening to this soundtrack is to make an effort to introduce Siobhan to more music. She likes show tunes so I’m trying Oklahoma! She and I watched the Todd-AO version a few times and now I have the album on her iPad. Great songs. Next I have to load the icon into her speech generating devices. Those speech generating devices have no standards at all. We have to reprogram her entire environment from scratch each time she moves to a new device. There are no open source Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) projects that include software and hardware.

Get It Right

So these are my thoughts as I listen to the songs from the Oklahoma! movie. My time spent working on movies and my time spent working on the web, a whole lifetime of rich experiences, informs everything I do. Let’s make sure that everyone has access to information and experiences so everyone can live a rich life. Good things take time and if you take a slightly slower approach and use open web standards you’ll find that you can surely make your projects perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust. Get it right the first time.

Update

Siobhan used the icon for Oklahoma! and I helped her locate the soundtrack in the impenetrable wasteland that iOS Music has become. But that sounds like a topic for another post.

Stroke of Solstice

Winter Solstice 2015

Linda and I have been hosting “dinner with Siobhan” each Monday night for a while now. It’s a way of keeping Siobhan in touch with her friends. A couple of her friends have gone off to college and during dinner we video conference with them. One extra special good friend always shows up, and we occasionally attract other people who can’t make it regularly. The dinners are a way to provide Siobhan with variety in her weekly routine while letting her know that her friends care about her. Her cognitive disabilities mean that she can’t text back and forth with them but she can participate in video conferencing and loves it when people are here. This past Monday, December 21st, we had an exceptionally lively party with lots of people here. I made a big pot of my special meatballs, sausage and sauce. I cooked up a big box of De Checco angel hair (capelini) number 9 pasta, and we had salad, ginger beer, and sparkling cider. At 8:49 pm PST, the stroke of the Winter Solstice, I got a wonderful solstice card and we distributed some gifts, but not all gifts, since some were Christmas gifts. It takes a little extra thought to live in a mixed Solstice/Christmas family.

The Next Day

The next day dawned like many others. Hours of getting Siobhan ready for her day program, bustle around the kitchen, showers, checking schedules, getting ourselves ready for the day. Siobhan had an appointment at 3:00 pm in Beverly Hills at Lerman and Son Orthotics and Prosthetics for an orthotic fitting. She returned from her day program at 12:30 pm, I fed her lunch and eventually we made our way to Beverly Hills. Linda joined us directly from work and we did the appointment together. The fitting went well and now Siobhan has new Cascade DAFOs for her feet. Finished, we went out on the street and I said something to Siobhan and noticed that I was talking differently. We came in two cars, and Siobhan elected to ride back with Linda so off they went, closely followed by me. In the car I began experimenting with speaking. I wasn’t doing too well. My speech was slurred. I was in trouble. We arrived home quickly and I indicated that Linda should call my cardiologist. She looked up the symptoms on a medical info card she keeps handy in the kitchen and concluded that I had one of the symptoms of a stroke. Thanks Linda, for being so smart and taking decisive action when needed. Linda and Siobhan took me to the emergency room at St. John’s Hospital here in Santa Monica, where staff started evaluating me immediately. From the time of first symptoms to the time of first evaluation was about an hour. This turned out to be a crucial point.

Just In Time

As happens so often in this world, exact timing is very important. This has always been a bother to me. I have a diffused sense of time. I like to think that centuries of farming in my dad’s family have imprinted on me in some ways. Things in my time mirror appear longer. I also wonder why so many things start early in the day. From this you can see I’m not really cut out for reporting for work at a physical location. My dad always said about me: “he loves his job so much he’d lay down beside it.” But in this one special case, the case of getting me to the emergency room quickly, even I could tell that it was essential to do so. As it turns out, we arrived just in time.

Communication Rights

The evaluation team grew until the emergency room bay I was in was wall to wall people. As the assembled multitudes began to interrogate me they quickly decided that it was easier to get their information from Linda. Linda and Siobhan were outside the bay door and Siobhan was looking very upset. She normally does not like hospitals; she really doesn’t like hospitals when I’m the patient. Someone would ask me a question. Someone else would ask Linda. Linda answered, and then someone else would ask me another question. My communication rights went right out the window. I was reminded of Glenda Watson Hyatt’s life long struggle with being cut out of conversations with doctors because she is speech and language disabled. Some of the answers were being handled well by Linda but when she didn’t know something or had it different than I knew it to be and I had the answer the team was still deferring to her. In one instance I shouted to make my point. All heads swiveled in my direction, for an instant, and the cycle started over again. Frustrating.

Neurologist

I don’t know when, exactly, the neurologist arrived on the scene but when he did things got dramatically different. I will omit some details here because this is not a doctor show. The neurologist told me that a quick CAT scan showed no evidence that I was having a stroke but they were acting as if it were a stroke and there was one treatment for it, and it was essential to treat me immediately. This is where that timing thing comes in. The treatment had to be invoked quickly after first onset of symptoms. Later and the risks were greater than the cure. I chose to have the treatment.

Tissue Plasminogen Activator

This may not be a doctor show, but this detail is important. The treatment is known as tPA which stands for tissue plasminogen activator. There are guidelines for when to administer the treatment and by the time I was treated I was still well within the early window of opportunity. Also known as the clot buster, it broke up any clots anywhere in my body. There are more details such as possible side effects but I’m here at home on Friday typing away as if nothing happened. The only noticeable effect is my speech, which sounds slurred to me. The diagnosis dealing with my speech is dysarthria, resulting from neurological injury of the motor component of the motor-speech system. The doctors and speech and language pathologist all agree that I will probably lose the dysarthria entirely in a short period of time. I hope so. In the meantime I’m glad things turned out the way they did.

Discussion at @AccessibleJoe